8/22/07

EPA Looks for Comments on their new document, “Effects of Climate Change on Aquatic Invasive Species and Implications for Management and Research”

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is announcing a 30-day public comment period for the draft document, "Effects of Climate Change on Aquatic Invasive Species and Implications for Management and Research'' (EPA/600/R-07/084); Technical comments should be in writing and must be received by EPA by September 10, 2007.

The draft "Effects of Climate Change on Aquatic Invasive Species and Implications for Management and Research'' can be downloaded here. Comments may be submitted electronically via http://www.regulations.gov, by mail, by facsimile, or by hand delivery/courier. “To view the Call for Comments,” or more contact information, click here.

For information on the public comment period, contact the Office of Environmental Information Docket; telephone: 202-566-1752; facsimile: 202-566-1753; or e-mail: ORD.Docket@epa.gov. For technical information, contact Britta Bierwagen, NCEA, telephone: 202-564-3388; facsimile: 202-565-0061; or e-mail: bierwagen.britta@epa.gov.

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Click on image for full size (326 Kb)
Courtesy of Lisa Gardiner

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